Scene when romeo and juliet meet

Baz Luhrmann's Act 1 Scene 5 of Romeo and Juliet Essay Example For Students | Artscolumbia

scene when romeo and juliet meet

Patience perforce with willful choler meeting. Makes my flesh tremble in their different greeting. I will withdraw, but this intrusion shall,. Now seeming sweet. Romeo and Juliet SCENE V. A hall in Capulet's house. Musicians Enter CAPULET, with JULIET and others of his house, meeting the Guests and Maskers. Baz Luhrmann's Act 1 Scene 5 of Romeo and Juliet Essay. B . After Romeo and Juliet get taken apart from their first meeting. Tybalt is quick to.

Luhrmann uses the props around Romeo and Juliet very effectively during their first meeting. The fish tank could have a lot of possible symbolism behind it, for instance a likely symbolic meaning is the fish tank acting as a barrier indicates that their love contains a lot of struggle because it is a large obstacle in their path. The close shots Luhrmann uses on their faces while they are staring at each other also adds to the feeling of love and passion Romeo and Juliet are feeling for each other and conveys both of them to the audience as love stricken, this gives a romantic atmosphere and makes the audience more relaxed because they would also want them to be together and in love.

The camera movement is quiet constant and just follows the movement of Romeo and Juliet as they have their eyes fixed at each other.

Romeo and Juliet Scenes

This gives a calm mood and atmosphere both in the film and for the audience watching. Luhrmann is keen on emphasising their emotion and thoughts when Romeo and Juliet first meet. He is using slow cuts, again while they gaze at each other through the fish tank, to focus attention and give emphasis to their faces expressions when they see each other for the first time. The flamboyant props, such as the red, long curtains and the golden statues at the staircases, and the setting of a lavish mansion really add to the chaotic atmosphere.

Capulet is clothed as Caesar which underlines his power and wealth. Tybalt is dressed as a devil to show his evil and dark nature.

scene when romeo and juliet meet

Lady Capulet is dressed as Cleopatra to show her beauty and also her seductive personality to lure men. After Romeo and Juliet get taken apart from their first meeting. Tybalt is quick to realise Romeo without his mask. Luhrmann uses many techniques to change of assert an atmosphere at any given point. Baz Luhrmann uses a low angle shot when showing Capulet scolding Tybalt and having Capulet above the camera signifies he is an important and powerful person because it is as if the audience is looking up at someone superior.

Romeo and Juliet Act 1 Scene 5 - Romeo first notices Juliet

Capulet being upstairs where there is no one could symbolise a higher place like heaven where powerful people watch you from there. Tybalt getting enraged over Romeo suggests that he is disrupting that solemnity and peace that you are meant to have in heaven. In this particular moment Luhrmann uses both high and low angles to convey the different positions or statuses that Romeo and Juliet are in.

Juliet is like the cursed beauty that has to marry someone who her parents want. Luhrmann uses medium shot eye-line matching while Romeo and Juliet have eventually found out who their real identities are and realise the reality dawning on them.

scene when romeo and juliet meet

You are going to set everything at sixes and sevens, are you? You are going to set all by the ears, are you? The origin of the phrase 'to set cock-a-hoop' is doubtful.

scene when romeo and juliet meet

Blount, Glossographia,says that the 'cock' was the spigot of a vessel, and that this being taken out and laid on the 'hoop' of the vessel "they used to drink up the ale as it ran out without intermission But there is no clear evidence that 'cock' ever meant a spigot, or that the 'hoop' of the vessel was used as a place on which to lay it.

Whatever its origin, the phrase came by extension to mean a To abandon oneself to reckless enjoyment, b To cast off all restraint, become reckless, c To give a loose to all disorder, to set all by the ears. In modern use 'cock-a-hoop' means elated, exultant, boastfully and loudly triumphant.

scene when romeo and juliet meet

The attempt to connect 'hoop' with the F. Ulrici points out that this is an answer to some remark of one of the guests, and so also the words, 'I know what,' in the next line, are an interrupted answer or address to a guest. So, too, perhaps, the words 'marry 'tis time,' in the following line.

scene when romeo and juliet meet

The reading of the old copies is "This trick may chance to scathe you, I know what": You must contrary me! The verb contrary with the accent penultimate was common in former days, and the adjective with the same accent is still to be heard among uneducated persons.

Well said, my hearts! Well done, my brave fellows; my hearts, an exclamation of encouragement; so "my hearties," still among sailors: I'll make you quiet, if you will not be quiet of your own accord, I will take means to make you so.

Shakes so my single state of man," though the shaking there is figurative. Steevens quotes the proverb "Patience perforce is a medicine for a mad dog. Lettsom takes sweet as a substantive and convert as transitive, but the verb is frequently used intransitively in Shakespeare, and it seems unecessary to insist upon the antithesis.

Romeo + Juliet meeting scene

Ulrici shows that 'Romei' was formerly a title given to pilgrims to Rome, by later Italian writers to pilgrims generally, and thinks that this accounts for Romeo's assuming a pilgrim's dress. Palmers were pilgrims who had visited the sacred shrine in Palestine, and brought back palms in token of their having accomplished their pilgrimage. They are here called holy as having thus earned forgiveness of their sins.

Grant White follows the old copies in putting a comma only after do in the previous line, and explains, "they [i. O trespass sweetly urged! You kiss by the book, "you kiss methodically; you offer as many reasons for kissing, as could have been found in a treatise professedly written on the subject" Amner, i.

What, who; but with a sense of indefiniteness.