Dental health and its relationship with chronic illness

Oral Health: The Silent Epidemic

dental health and its relationship with chronic illness

periodontitis, gums pull away from the teeth and form spaces (called .. Possible explanations for relationships with chronic disease. Scientists. But did you know that it's important to your overall health, too? A number of chronic diseases and conditions have been linked to poor oral. A healthy mouth enables not only nutrition of the physical body, but also enhances Oral disease is the most widespread chronic disease, despite being highly.

dental health and its relationship with chronic illness

Endocarditis typically occurs when bacteria or other germs from another part of your body, such as your mouth, spread through your bloodstream and attach to damaged areas in your heart. Some research suggests that heart disease, clogged arteries and stroke might be linked to the inflammation and infections that oral bacteria can cause. Periodontitis has been linked to premature birth and low birth weight. Certain conditions also might affect your oral health, including: Diabetes reduces the body's resistance to infection — putting the gums at risk.

Oral Health: The Silent Epidemic

Gum disease appears to be more frequent and severe among people who have diabetes. Research shows that people who have gum disease have a harder time controlling their blood sugar levels, and that regular periodontal care can improve diabetes control. Osteoporosis — which causes bones to become weak and brittle — might be linked with periodontal bone loss and tooth loss.

dental health and its relationship with chronic illness

Drugs used to treat osteoporosis carry a small risk of damage to the bones of the jaw. Worsening oral health is seen as Alzheimer's disease progresses. Other conditions that might be linked to oral health include eating disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, head and neck cancers, and Sjogren's syndrome — an immune system disorder that causes dry mouth. Because of these potential links, tell your dentist if you're taking any medications or have had any changes in your overall health — especially if you've had any recent illnesses or you have a chronic condition, such as diabetes.

How can I protect my oral health? To protect your oral health, practice good oral hygiene every day. Brush your teeth at least twice a day with fluoride toothpaste. Eat a healthy diet and limit between-meal snacks. Replace your toothbrush every three to four months or sooner if bristles are frayed. In addition, some medicines that treat osteoporosis can cause problems in the bones of the jaw.

dental health and its relationship with chronic illness

Sexually transmitted infections A number of different sexually transmitted infections STIs can cause symptoms in your mouth. HPV human papillomavirus — Some strains can cause warts in the mouth or throat. Other strains can cause head and neck cancers.

Oral Health and Chronic Disease

These can be hard to detect. They usually develop at the base of the tongue, the tonsils, or the back of the throat. Herpes — Herpes simplex virus type 1 causes cold sores and other mouth lesions.

Dental Health & Chronic Disease

Type 2 usually causes blisters in the genitals. But both types can be passed between the genitals and mouth. So type 2 could also cause painful blisters in or around the mouth.

dental health and its relationship with chronic illness

Gonorrhea — This bacterial infection can cause soreness and burning in your throat. Sometimes you may see white spots in your mouth, as well.

Syphilis — In its primary first stage, you may get sores chancres on your lips, tongue, or other places inside your mouth. The sores may go away, even if left untreated. But you will still have the infection and can spread it.

dental health and its relationship with chronic illness

Preterm birth Severe gum disease has been linked to preterm labor and low birth weight in babies. Research suggests that oral bacteria can affect the placenta and interfere with the growth and development of the baby. It also shows that a severe oral infection could trigger labor too early.

This could cause the baby to be born prematurely.

Oral health: A window to your overall health - Mayo Clinic

Things to consider Periodontal disease can have serious effects on your health. If you notice that you have any of the symptoms of gum disease, call your doctor or dentist. Red, swollen, or tender gums. Bleeding when brushing or flossing.